Pipe tobacco packages

Tobacco packaging has changed a lot over the centuries. From the beginning around 1600, tobacco was sold loose, sometimes even freshly cut in the shop and then wrapped in a piece of paper. In the 18th century, the paper tobacco bag was widely used. Initially these are square so-called cartridge packs, later cone shaped bags. From 1900 on, a lot of pipe tobacco is pre-packaged in the tobacco factory. Still in paper, which of course leads to a rapid dehydration of the content. The real enthusiast transferred the tobacco at home into his pocket tobacco box or a tobacco jar.

When vacuum-sealed cans were developed, it became the standard for pipe tobacco sales in the 1950s. Every manufacturer who wants to sell his product ensures appealing packaging, so the tins are colourfully printed with logo, brand name and the specific taste of the tobacco. Over the years it has become increasingly difficult to read the contents from the packaging. Vanilla or whiskey is clear, but at Nr. 1 Medium one might guess the taste.

In the collection, the Amsterdam Pipe Museum prefers to keep the tins from before the time when the health warnings take over the packaging. Of course, this certainly applies to the photos of medical ailments. This pushes the tobacco brand even further away. This page gives another picture of the packaging as it was customary at the time, still appealing to the tobacco lover. This form of enjoyment is no longer allowed nowadays.

APM 26.552
APM 26.553
APM 18.434
APM 18.434
APM 19.515
APM 26.553
APM 25.407
APM 26.552
APM 26.553
APM 26.552
APM 26.056
APM 26.993